Re: FBI on "Active Shooter Incidents" during 2021

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tonguengroover wrote: Mon May 23, 2022 4:51 pm Up 50% eh?

Been carrying OWB a little lately, mostly with a T-shirt and a collared shirt open covering my gun.
I got one LGS that wants my gun givin to the check out person de-cocked and empty and open bolt, the closer one lets me keep it on, just don't pull it out .
I don't like handing off my weapon to any ole stranger.
I would have a hard time doing any business with that LGS. I don't like handing off my weapon, either.

Every employee at my main LGS carries when on the clock. Most open-carry, even AIWB. What they do off the clock is none of my business (and when on the clock, it's only that I notice it--I don't have any say in the store policy). I could walk in with a pistol on each hip and as long as they are in holsters, I'd be fine. Any "loose" firearms have to be in a case of some sort, though, and they will loan you a rifle case if yours is out in the car without a case.
Eventually I'll figure out this signature thing and decide what I want to put here.

Re: FBI on "Active Shooter Incidents" during 2021

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Academics and other experts who track the rising and falling of crime in America were expecting on Monday to see a fresh batch of data from the FBI: quarterly aggregated crime stats (courtesy of police departments) that would offer a picture of trends across the country in 2021. Instead, the agency announced this week that it would not be releasing the statistics, due to a lack of data provided by local police departments. The agency noted that it has received data from 9,881 law enforcement agencies, out of a total of 18,818 agencies, for 2021. In order to release the data, the agency required a 60% participation rate. (The agency did make available the non-aggregated data for individual participating cities with populations over 100,000.)
To track the numbers that police departments report, the FBI for decades used a system called the Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) to collect data. But in 2021, the Bureau switched to a different system, called the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), which provides more details on crimes that are reported. Though the change is meant to improve tracking, this week’s announcement from the FBI highlights what experts say are serious concerns about its impact on crime statistics for years to come.

The problem is that a large portion of police departments do not have the NIBRS system, which is expensive and can be difficult to implement into a department. According to the Bureau of Statistics, it could cost up to $377,000 for a department to switch over to NIBRS and over $53,000 for annual maintenance. According to the FBI, 63% of all police agencies in the country are using the NIBRS system; however, many of the big cities, like New York and Los Angeles, don’t use NIBRS, which means their crime trends will be completely left out of the FBI’s data analysis for 2021, including the annual reports.
Crime, particularly homicide, has been a noteworthy issue since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Homicide numbers increased by 29% in 2020, per the FBI’s own report last year, which used UCR numbers. The increase slowed a bit in 2021 but many cities still experienced a record number of killings. But the lack of concrete data can make it difficult to accurately assess what is happening. In addition to the problems presented by cities that have not yet adopted NIBRS, some experts also believe that the FBI could better handle the data it does have. The new system allows for details of incident-by-incident reporting, but the Bureau aggregates it before making it public. Some believe it would make more sense for the FBI to just put out the raw data that they receive. (That is, instead of releasing the total number of homicides from a city, they would release the details of each particular incident.)
https://time.com/6159812/fbi-crime-stats-data/

How accurate are the FBI numbers?
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: FBI on "Active Shooter Incidents" during 2021

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tonguengroover wrote: Mon May 23, 2022 4:51 pm Up 50% eh?

Been carrying OWB a little lately, mostly with a T-shirt and a collared shirt open covering my gun.
I got one LGS that wants my gun givin to the check out person de-cocked and empty and open bolt, the closer one lets me keep it on, just don't pull it out .
I don't like handing off my weapon to any ole stranger.
I don't carry OWB but these days, I carry most of the time in my house and ALWAYS outside, where it's legal. Too many weirdos with guns these days.

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