Norma extreme long range .22lr

1
Wondering how they get the long range accuracy. They refer to the high velocity, but it's just 1165 fps, with a heavy (43 grain) bullet.
They do talk about the aerodynamics, can that be enough to get greater range out of a heavy bullet than all the 38 and 40 grain 1150 to 1250 fps rounds?

"The patented bullet design features an elongated bullet tip for improved aerodynamics and a world’s first rocket tail. The streamlined base causes less negative pressure at the tail, which is the main reason for the deceleration of a projectile. As a result, the projectile maintains speed over longer distances and produces an unmatched accuracy round after round. In combination with higher velocity, the bullet has a flat and stable trajectory, which makes it the perfect choice for long range target shooting. In addition, the increased weight of the bullet also leads to a lower crosswind sensitivity. Due to these improved flight characteristics, the cartridge sets a new standard of precision at distances beyond 500+ yards."

https://normausa.com/product/range-and- ... gr-50-qty/

Re: Norma extreme long range .22lr

2
I'd like to see a pic of that rocket tail. A 43 grain bullet can be deflect by an insult from the next county, so color me skeptical about this. Will love to read your review. Fifty cents a round for .22 means it has to be able to whistle Dixie and cook my breakfast to be worth fifty cents a round. :-)

CDF
Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world

Re: Norma extreme long range .22lr

4
CDFingers wrote: Sat Jun 22, 2024 11:54 am I'd like to see a pic of that rocket tail. A 43 grain bullet can be deflect by an insult from the next county, so color me skeptical about this. Will love to read your review. Fifty cents a round for .22 means it has to be able to whistle Dixie and cook my breakfast to be worth fifty cents a round. :-)

CDF
Yah, that price is STEEP!

I spend enough money on other calibers that I don't expect I'll buy any for my own testing, or even to examine it myself.

Besides, I don't have ready access to the kinds of places Paul Harrell used for his videos and testing. I'll have to trust others' data.
Eventually I'll figure out this signature thing and decide what I want to put here.

Re: Norma extreme long range .22lr

5
i really, really, really don't like the lube Norma uses for their Tac-22 series. But I'm compulsive about trying out different .22 ammo, so the next time I see it in a store, it'll end up on a shelf waiting for the next time I get out to a range.

In theory, the heavier bullet - remember, we're still talking .22LR here - has more inertia and should be more resistant to aerodynamic forces than the usual 36-to-40 grains. All .22LR tapers a little towards the tail because of the antiquated design parameters, but since the brass doesn't need to be reloadable I could see interesting approaches to tapering for boat-tailed bullets.

The velocity is the key parameter here, though. 1165 is barely supersonic at 100 degrees Fahrenheit, which means it's touching the subsonic zone for destabilization coming out of the barrel under all reasonable climate conditions. But what's the barrel length? We all know barrel length has a huge impact on muzzle velocity for carbine rounds like .22LR, .357 or .44 Magnum. Out of a pistol, this is probably subsonic, and avoids the transition with a heavier bullet that's slightly more resistant to aerodynamic forces. I suspect there's a barrel length where this becomes much less accurate, and I'm curious to find out what it is.

For me, I've always found velocity contributes more to precision than anything else in .22LR. YMMV.

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