SCCY pistols, anyone?

1
Anyone have or have shot a SCCY pistol? A set of disposably-priced .380 and/or 9 mm guns would be appealing. DAO or DA/SA with decocker (no safety) is my preferred carry type, so these look about right. Not going to use 'em for Bullseye shooting, so as long as they're fairly reliable, drop safe and the trigger doesn't feel like it's literally cutting through a Brillo pad soaked with sand they should be acceptable.

Terribly marketing on these, BTW. I believe they want you to pronounce the name "sky," but I can't imagine anyone wouldn't read it as "sucky," particularly at this price point.
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Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

2
A coworker of mine had one. We went to the range and I shot it. I don't understand how that gun is such a wrist breaker and ear splitter. I mean it's only a 9 mm. There is a reason they're cheap, they're cheap. Not to offend any owners that are on this forum. It's a gun
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Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

3
FlyGuy wrote: Fri Dec 09, 2022 11:04 am I don't understand how that gun is such a wrist breaker and ear splitter.
Maybe the weight? The smallest 9 mm I’ve shot is a G26. Specs say those weigh 21 oz empty and the SCCY 15 oz. That difference is not nuthin’.

Is the bore axis high? I haven’t really tried to measure that yet.
IMR4227: Zero to 900 in 0.001 seconds

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Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

5
Buck13 wrote:
FlyGuy wrote: Fri Dec 09, 2022 11:04 am I don't understand how that gun is such a wrist breaker and ear splitter.
Maybe the weight? The smallest 9 mm I’ve shot is a G26. Specs say those weigh 21 oz empty and the SCCY 15 oz. That difference is not nuthin’.

Is the bore axis high? I haven’t really tried to measure that yet.
I kind of think this too. I’ve had a a S&W Shield 9mm and I think it’s 23 oz. - the smallest 9mm that I could shoot well. My air weight 642 at 15 oz is a struggle beyond 5yrds with .38 +p.


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Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

6
No personal experience with SCCY, but in principle, they should be fine to carry and miserable to shoot.

Short barrels are earsplitters - think the difference between a .22 rifle and handgun. I wouldn't shoot the latter without ear pro unless I had to. I don't shoot the former without ear pro because it's still not a good idea, even if it's tolerable. Being light, recoil is also going to be rough - for me, .357 out of a 23 oz. K6s, stung fierce, and imagine a 15 oz. 9mm is going to be similar. If you use lighter, faster rounds in carry pieces to mitigate recoil, that's going to add to the noise once you get supersonic.

Came across a table somewhere that compared felt recoil for various rounds as a function of gun weight. Ultralight .357s and 9mms were comparable with .44 Magnum. Good grip and other fundamentals are key to shooting them well - and a lot of practice. It's a lot easier to practice with a gun that's fun to shoot, especially as some of us get older and have increasing difficulty with grip, arthritis, and vision. If you can carry something heavier that you'll shoot more often and stay effective with, well then. Do.

That said, safety is a lot more than being armed.

Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

7
wings wrote: Sat Dec 10, 2022 1:38 pm No personal experience with SCCY, but in principle, they should be fine to carry and miserable to shoot.

Short barrels are earsplitters - think the difference between a .22 rifle and handgun. I wouldn't shoot the latter without ear pro unless I had to. I don't shoot the former without ear pro because it's still not a good idea, even if it's tolerable. Being light, recoil is also going to be rough - for me, .357 out of a 23 oz. K6s, stung fierce, and imagine a 15 oz. 9mm is going to be similar. If you use lighter, faster rounds in carry pieces to mitigate recoil, that's going to add to the noise once you get supersonic.

Came across a table somewhere that compared felt recoil for various rounds as a function of gun weight. Ultralight .357s and 9mms were comparable with .44 Magnum. Good grip and other fundamentals are key to shooting them well - and a lot of practice. It's a lot easier to practice with a gun that's fun to shoot, especially as some of us get older and have increasing difficulty with grip, arthritis, and vision. If you can carry something heavier that you'll shoot more often and stay effective with, well then. Do.

That said, safety is a lot more than being armed.
Hadn't thought about shorter barrels being louder, though of course that's always been the case in my (limited) experience.)

Just looked up the SCCY. Looks like an ear-splitter and wrist-cracker for sure.

I'm trying to get myself psyched up to clean the old .380 Makarov (which should be easy) and take it to the range and shoot it (which is not.) The barrel is a little longer than the SCCY, (and it's way heavier, too, at 1.6 pounds) but my ears hurt just looking at the ammo box. It's such a little thug. I should make sure it comes along when I take a course, too.

I get it that guns this size and caliber are good for home defense, but I also keep thinking that in the heat of the moment, anticipating the pain and the big bang could make me hesitate or otherwise impair clear thinking. It's also a really different experience at the range-- for me, it's like, "Hmm, nine inside the circles-- any circle, big or little-- and the tenth didn't miss the target! Not bad!"
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Re: SCCY pistols, anyone?

8
I have a later model "SKY" (CPX-2) in my driving "Get home because______bag".

Some talk a lot of crap about any cheap pistol.

It doesn't look or feel cheap, just modern. Running a couple boxes of factory ammo thru it was easy.

It handles +p's just fine, makes the target at 15-20 feet no problem.

For the $, it is a perfect stash/emergency gun. They don't recommend it as a "pocket pistol", as lint can find it's way in and cause problems.
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