Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Signs Controversial ‘Public Disorder’ Bill Into Law

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) signed a controversial bill into law on Monday that critics say constitutes a direct attack on the First Amendment in the guise of combating “public disorder.”

Just before he signed the bill, DeSantis sought to justify his decision by painting an apocalyptic picture of burning cities and people in peril with law enforcement being told to stand down.

“We’re not going to let the mob win the day,” DeSantis said as he praised the bill’s specific protections for “all” of the state’s monuments — likely a reference to those honoring the Confederacy. Seeking to draw a contrast with Portland, Oregon, a Democratic-run city on the other side of the country, he added that “the state of Florida takes public safety very seriously.”

Then-President Donald Trump provoked a violent backlash in Portland last summer by deploying federal agents to the city, where clashes between right-wing groups and anti-racism protesters had become fodder for conservatives to decry a breakdown of law and order. In a violent and authoritarian show of force, unidentified federal officers dressed in military-style camouflage proceeded to abduct protesters in unmarked cars.

DeSantis, who took no questions, was joined by Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd, who used the platform to overtly threaten people who move to Florida and don’t vote for Republicans.

“We only want to share one thing as you move in hundreds a day,” Judd said, addressing an imagined crowd of newcomers. “Welcome to Florida, but don’t register to vote and vote the stupid way you did up North, or you’ll get what they got.”

The line drew strong laughter from DeSantis.

Among other things, the 61-page bill establishes stiffer penalties for violent protesting, allows for a “riot” to be declared if at least three people are involved, and creates a new, second-degree felony for “aggravated riots” involving more than 25 people.

The law also gives the state power to override city and county-level decisions regarding law enforcement budgets and opens local governments up to lawsuits in the event they fail to stop what the state defines as a riot.

Florida Democrats, who staunchly opposed the bill, voiced deep concerns Monday about its chilling effect on free speech and nonviolent demonstrations.

“This Governor and his Republican allies love to talk about the Constitution, while shredding it with extreme legislation like HB 1,” Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried, a Democrat, said in a statement. “Silencing the speech of those seeking equality is straight from the Communist regime playbook.”

“The criminal aspects of this bill are already illegal,” she continued. “HB 1 protects no one, makes no one safer, and does nothing to make people’s lives better. It’s simply to appease the Governor’s delusion of widespread lawlessness, and it’s frightening to imagine the lengths to which he’ll go to strip away rights and freedoms for political gain.”

“The message from this Governor and his enablers is loud and clear: if you disagree with him, you will be silenced.”

Florida’s law passed against a backdrop of aggressive police action elsewhere in the country. In Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, officers arrested and violently assaulted journalists from dozens of media outlets covering protests over the police shooting of Daunte Wright last week.

And just 10 miles from Brooklyn Center, closing arguments are being heard in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd last year.
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/florida- ... 5a3a5a49d4

Why don't they just change the police uniforms to white sheets and get it over with. Florida home of the Ku Klux Kops. :sarcasm:
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

Re: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Signs Controversial ‘Public Disorder’ Bill Into Law

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lurker wrote: Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:25 pm maybe this should be applied to mobs which try to invade the capitol?
Now those people are good hard working Republican Americans that just wanted to see that justice done to correct an illegal election , brought on by letting people vote that should not have been allowed to vote. :sarcasm:
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

Re: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Signs Controversial ‘Public Disorder’ Bill Into Law

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Just a race to the bottom to be seen as the 'new trump', complete with 'law and order'(as long as it's not the Capital attempted coup) and embracing the 'Big Lie' of trump the traitor. Along with lucifer cruz, pompass ass pompeo..even fellow traitors like hawley....pence? He's done..the traitors didn't shout 'hang mike pence' for nothing. The right wing traitors haven't forgotten.

Re: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Signs Controversial ‘Public Disorder’ Bill Into Law

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Fabiola Santiago: Thanks to DeSantis' fascist policies, civil-rights lawyers have their hands full in Florida

A civil-rights fight looms in Florida courts — and not a minute too soon.

Hurrah to the civil-rights lawyers who filed a lawsuit in federal court in Orlando last week to challenge a newly enacted law that runs roughshod over people's right to protest.

They're needed here before it's too late, and Confederate-friendly Floriduh finds a way to secede from the Union.

Already, Florida lawmakers have assaulted and trampled the U.S. Constitution during this legislative session like the state hasn't seen since Jim Crow days. Every bill, every strategy was already cooked, party-ready, at the behest of the state's maximum leader, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

When he quacks like a fascist, the GOP choir, from Miami to Tallahassee, applauds him with fervor.

DeSantis is, after all, channeling his political mentor, Donald Trump, and following his bombastic, destructive script to reelection next year, and onward, to the White House in 2024, perhaps.

If, in the process, DeSantis and his enablers turn the Constitution into a pliable document, chipped away by legislating at the state level in order to win elections, then so be it.

If, in the process, DeSantis quacks like a racist, that's just the price of doing business with the base.

That's why, surrounded by more than a dozen white men and women in deep-red Polk County as Americans waited for the Derek Chauvin verdict, a proud-as-a-peacock DeSantis signed his so-called "anti-riot" bill.

That's why, in the aftermath of the verdict, DeSantis told Fox News' Laura Ingraham — with a straight face — that Chauvin's conviction may have happened because, "The jury is scared of what a mob may do."

Same DeSantis who last year when the nation saw the George Floyd video, which prompted the protests he's now trying to outlaw, said: "George Floyd's murder was appalling."

Same DeSantis who then says to Ingraham, another bona fide bigot, that there's no systemic racism in this country when he and the Legislature are targeting minorities.

Without an ounce of sensitivity, DeSantis assaults the rights of Floridians to protest, presiding over a major crackdown on free speech, delivered by the acquiescent, overwhelmingly Republican Legislature via the HB 1 bill — their No. 1 priority after more than a year of a pandemic.

Coming in a close second: voter suppression.

At first boasting that Florida had the most well-run elections in the country when he delivered the state to Trump in 2020, DeSantis ordered another assault, this one on voting by mail.

And Republican lawmakers proceed to require people to re-register to receive mail-in ballots after just one election cycle; curtail ballot boxes; and change signature-matching laws.

As of this writing, the election bills had been watered down by the Senate, which did away, at the request of election officials and voting-rights groups, with the massive undertaking of requiring the updating of signatures. The remaining bill, still controversial, needs a full Senate vote and reconciliation with the House bill to make it to the governor's desk.

All of these efforts are transparent, multilayered assaults on Floridians' rights.

Who's going to go to a protest knowing that if a few protesters get violent or more rowdy than police feel like tolerating — and you get caught in the melee — you'll be carted off to jail, charged with a felony and held without bail like a murderer?

What low-income minority resident who works — and they're the ones holding down essential jobs tied to a schedule — is going to risk losing a job to stand in hours-long lines when they find themselves without a mail-in ballot?

The governor is trashing the sacred right to vote, making it harder, not easier for U.S. citizens to participate in democracy. And, with the anti-protest measure, he deals a big blow not only to the protesters, but to the hard work some police departments in South Florida are doing to build trust in our communities.

Sen. Shevrin Jones, who represents parts of northern Miami-Dade and southern Broward, best summed up the intention — and the injustice — of the anti-protest bill on the Senate Floor.

"You don't want us on the streets. You don't want us to kneel at games. ... Our response to injustice is to protest, but your response is to criminalize it when the recourse for us is to turn to the streets to make our voices heard in this unjust system."

In his quest for absolute power, the Ivy League-educated governor, a lawyer, forgets the law of the land isn't that of his scribes in the Legislature, but the document signed on Sept. 17, 1787.

Bring on the civil-rights lawyers.

Florida needs them to show the governor who's boss.
https://this.kiji.is/759333691660058624 ... 7532812385
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

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